SLEEP RESISTANCES IN THE PERIOD OF SEPARATION ANXIETY

Separation anxiety in infants is a normal developmental stage that usually occurs between 8 and 18 months of age. During this period, babies may be worried about being separated from their caregivers and it is known that this may affect their sleep patterns. More on the Blog...

7/21/20234 min read

Separation anxiety in infants is a normal developmental stage that usually occurs between 8 and 18 months of age. During this period, babies may be worried about being separated from their caregivers and it is known that this may affect their sleep patterns.

The effects of separation anxiety in infants on sleep can include:

1. Night Awakenings: Babies may wake up more frequently at night when they are separated from the caregiver or when the caregiver is not present.

2. Difficulty Sleeping: Babies with separation anxiety may resist pre-sleep routines and find it difficult to fall asleep.

3. Short Sleeps: In this period, babies may sleep for shorter periods and their sleep may be interrupted more frequently.

4. Waking Up From Sleep: Babies with separation anxiety may wake up during the night and cry and call the caregiver.

5. Greater Need for Attachment Objects: Babies may need more attachment objects (for example, a blanket or a toy) to their mother, father, or caregiver during this period, these objects give them a sense of security and security.

Although the period of separation anxiety is a normal development process in babies, it can be more pronounced in some babies and can be challenging for parents. Parents can show a caring and understanding approach to provide the safety and security that their babies need during this period. Establishing pre-bedtime routines, calming activities with your baby, and allowing attachment objects can help her cope better with separation anxiety.